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Posts Tagged ‘eggs’

We will be selling at two farmers’ markets this weekend.  While two markets is not much for market veterans, it will be a lot for us in our first season.  We will be selling our full range of products at both markets.  This includes grass-fed lamb and goat, pastured whole chickens, and free-range eggs.  Our animals are raised using organic, antibiotic free methods.  Our poultry are also supplemented with organic grain.

Friday, May 17, we will be at the Normandy Farms Organic Market (79th Street and Marsh Road) from 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.  Last week’s inaugural market went quite well considering the little publicity at the time and the rain during the market.

Saturday, May 18, we will be at the Zionsville Farmers’ Market (www.zionsvillefarmersmarket.org) from 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.  This is opening day for the farmers’ market.  The annual Brick Street Market (a craft market) will also be held in Zionsville Saturday beginning at 10:00 a.m.

Please stop by one of the markets for your local, organic food needs.

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May is always a busy month for the farm and the farmers.  There are gardens to be planted, livestock pasture to manage, chicks for which to care, birthdays to celebrate, and mothers to honor.

We will be participating in our first farmers’ market this Friday.  A new organic market will be held at Normandy Farms (79th and Marsh Road) from 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., May 10.  We will be selling eggs and whole chickens at this market.  They already have a vendor for lamb.  We will also be selling at the Zionsville Farmers’ Market beginning Saturday, May 18.  We will be selling all of our available products.  Please review our price list for information on pricing before visiting the markets.

For our current customers, you may notice that our prices have increased.  We recently completed an analysis of our poultry feed costs and, thanks to increases in grain prices, our feed prices have also increased.  We also have to cover the cost of market participation.  We have paid more than $500 in permit fees, licenses, vendor fees, and liability insurance to participate in these markets and bring our products to more convenient locations for you, the customer.  We appreciate your continued support.

Don’t forget Mothers’ Day.  It is this Sunday, May 12.  The Loft Restaurant at Traders Point Creamery always has special meals for Mothers’ Day and will be serving a Full Circle Farm lamb frittata for brunch.  We will all be there bright and early at 9:30 a.m.  Make your reservations now.  They confirmed ours today.

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We finally got started on our rotational grazing for the season.  The animals were more than ready.  We had them closed off to one section of the pasture for two weeks, allowing the rest of the pasture to get some growth.  The first picture shows the fairly distinct line between the two sections of pasture.  The rested pasture is six inches tall while the other section has been eaten to the ground.  The second picture shows the difference of no grazing.  Areas where the animals had not been permitted to graze at all are nearly a foot tall.

This will be our second season of rotational grazing.  We learned several lessons during our first season.

  1.  Portable shelters must be fairly stout, which makes them less portable.  The winds during severe storms and during the winter picked up and destroyed the portable shelters we built last summer.  This year we are toying with no shelters since the animals’ coats protect them from the rain.  However, we may also go with a few sturdy, less mobile shelters.
  2. Our sheep will not respect standard multi-strand electric fencing.  They have discovered that if they stick their heads between the wires, any shock to their wooly coats as they go through the fence is nominal.  The cows, however, rarely cross the fence.
  3. It doesn’t matter if you are feeding them the best quality, third-cutting hay available, sheep will still eat your pine trees.  See #2 on the fence issue.  That is why we will now use electric netting to keep the animals in place and is also why we have had to plant more pine trees.
  4. This past winter, we allowed the animals to have the run of the entire pasture, eating up any new grass in the early spring.  You can see the difference in the grass that has not been touched.  It may be better to have a “sacrifice” area closer to the barn, keeping the animals there the entire winter and allowing the rest of the pasture to get a better start.  This should allow us to start our rotational grazing sooner in the season and save on hay.  That will be something we try during this season.

Don’t forget.  We will be at the Zionsville Farmers’ Market beginning Saturday morning, May 18, from 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.  We hope to see you there.

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. . . have brought lots of water.  As of this writing we have had 4.75” this month (3.25” just this week).  With that and 11 inches of snow melt from late March, we have definitely recovered from last year’s drought.

 . . . bring lots of green grass.  We’ve closed off the animals to the east side of the field to allow the rest of the pasture to grow faster.  We hope to start rotational grazing by the first of May.  We have resolved ourselves to using electric netting this year as the sheep have been completely ignoring our standard electric fencing.

. . . have brought lots of eggs.  Since we knew we would have a lot of eggs, we bought an incubator this winter so we could hatch some of our own eggs.  Farmer Betsy already used the incubator to hatch one batch of chickens at her school.  We started our own chickens at the house and they are hatching as I write.  I have also started finding turkey eggs in the middle of the barn, where the other animals could step on them.  I have started collecting them and we hope to hatch those too.  Hopefully the rest of the birds are finding other safe spots to lay their eggs.

. . . are bringing blooming fruit trees.  All of our fruit trees and plants are budding and blooming nicely.  Since we got a normal start on spring this year, hopefully we won’t have any late freezes to jeopardize the fruit.

I know, I know.  April showers bring May flowers.  But, it’s not May yet.  May looks to bring its own set of opportunities to the farm.

We will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  Please stop in to fulfill your local, organic food needs.

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Caught Red-Handed

Well, not quite red-handed but one of us did spend a little too much time in the sun (that would be the blond, fair-skinned farmer).  They finally caught us and made us return to the farm.  It didn’t really take that much persuading though.

Farmhand Emily did an awesome job while we were away.  The animals were content and she did some greatly appreciated housekeeping.  She even got the snow to melt and the grass to green while we were gone.

We will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  We will also be around on Saturday planting trees.  We received 400 trees from the state nursery this week.  If you come by and help us on Saturday, we’ll give you a free dozen eggs.  We currently have available:

Eggs from free-range hens fed organic grain @$3.50 per dozen (and lots of them)

Whole Chickens raised on pasture and fed organic grain @ $4.00 per pound (lots of chicken too)

Hormone-free and antibiotic-free grass-fed lamb and goat (please see the price list for pricing by cut)

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Hippity Hoppity

Easter is on its way.  I wish spring really was too.  We will again be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  For your Easter dinner, we still have turkeys and whole chickens available for $4.00/lb. and leg of lamb available for $15.00/lb.  We also have ground lamb for $9.00/lb. and lamb chops for $10.00/lb.  If you like goat meat, we have some ground goat sausage for $7.00/lb.  There are still plenty of eggs available too at $3.50/dozen.

If you can make it through the snow they are forecasting, please come by.  If you can’t make it Sunday, you are always welcome to visit evenings during the week.

Finally, it is with sadness I share that Charles Stultz passed this week at the age of 98.  Charlie was the previous owner of our farm.  This was his farm for 59 years.  Charlie had other parties interested in the farm but we have always believed Charlie allowed us to purchase the farm because he saw himself, and how he would have cared for the farm, in us.  We are very appreciative of the opportunity you have allowed us Charlie.  May you rest in peace.

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We will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  We currently have available:

Eggs from free-range hens fed organic grain

Whole Chickens raised on pasture and fed organic grain

Hormone-free and antibiotic-free grass-fed lamb and goat

We accept cash, checks, and credit cards as payment.

Four more lambs were born this week.  We now have 16 lambs on the farm and Bambi is still living in the house with us.  Bambi is the bottle lamb we saved last week.  We tried to re-introduce her to her mother and, it worked, but she just wasn’t strong enough to take the cold, damp weather.  So Bambi has been living inside with us.  Farmer Betsy has even been taking her to school every day.  Bambi gets lots of attention.

We can’t let Bambi live inside too long though.  We’re already tired of cleaning up after her but it is also not healthy for her, physically or emotionally, to live inside too long.  She is already getting too attached to us and she needs to adjust to the outdoors.  I have put together a dog kennel in the yard for Bambi and we will probably start getting her used to the outdoors this weekend as the weather warms.

If you are visiting us on Facebook, please visit our website at www.thefullcirclefarm.com for our price list and more information about our farm.  If you are visiting our website, you may also become our friend on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/fullcircle.farm.5.

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Soggy and Soupy

ImageWe will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  We currently have available:

Eggs from free-range hens fed organic grain

Whole Chickens raised on pasture and fed organic grain

Hormone-free and antibiotic-free grass-fed lamb and goat

We accept cash, checks, and credit cards as payment.

It’s been a fairly busy week on the farm.  Since our last post, nine more lambs have been born.  We even have our first, and hopefully only, bottle lamb.  She’s sleeping under a heat lamp right now.  The chickens have really started on the eggs too.  We are working our way toward two dozen each day.

We always welcome visitors to the farm.  Please come visit the lambs this weekend.  If you plan on an outside tour, make sure to bring your muck boots.  The recent rains and melted snows have made our pastures quite soggy and soupy.  We look forward to seeing you.

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Thank You

We will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  We currently have available:

Eggs from free-range hens fed organic grain

Whole Chickens raised on pasture and fed organic grain

Hormone-free and antibiotic-free grass-fed lamb and goat

We accept cash, checks, and credit cards as payment.

As we begin this year, we would like to take a moment and thank all of you for the support you have given us and our farm.  Our farm is still just getting started and like all youngsters, it needs all the help it can get.

When you support Full Circle Farm, you are supporting a business that is improving the environment.  As you know, we are always looking to mimic nature and in 2013, we intend to launch a full scale reforestation project on our farm.  Our long term goals include bringing even more diversified wildlife to our farm; planting trees for food, shelter, and air quality, and; producing quality foodstuffs for the animals and all of you.

In the news, you hear many reports about the economy.  We believe the only solution to our economic woes is to “buy local” and “buy American-made”.  As a small local business, we buy from other local businesses.  We buy our organic feed from Kern, Kirtley, and Herr Elevator here in Boone County.  We have our animals processed at This Old Farm in Colfax, Indiana and J&M Processing near Hagerstown, Indiana.  Larger items that we cannot purchase locally, we strive to buy “Made in the USA”.  When you purchase meat or eggs from us, you are part of the economic solution.

For 2013 and beyond, we hope to see Full Circle Farm lamb become the regularly served lamb in area restaurants.  Several of our lambs were sold through This Old Farm Processing and a couple were sold to The Loft Restaurant at Traders Point Creamery.

In 2013, we will be holding a few festivals as well as working with the Lebanon Arts Council to co-host a heritage music festival.  We invite all of you to attend the festivals or just stop by.  We love what we do and fell blessed to be able to farm.

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We will be open this Sunday from 12 – 6 p.m.  We currently have available free-range eggs, pastured whole chickens, and grass-fed lamb and goat.  We have had quite a bit of website activity recently, at least for us.  For those of you new to Full Circle Farm, we have an open farm policy and welcome you to visit any time.  We are generally available evenings through the week and afternoons during the weekend, but, who knows what may come up.  Our regular Sunday hours are to ensure that someone will be here to serve you.  We accept cash, check, and credit cards as payment.

We hope you all enjoyed your Valentine week with the ones you love.  It has been an interesting week on the farm.  We had our first set of triplet lambs this week only to lose two of them by week’s end.  The mother ewe has calmed down and is feeding the remaining ram lamb quite well.  It’s heartbreaking to lose any animal, especially when they pass as you are trying to save them.  Unfortunately, that’s part of life on the farm.  Fortunately, there is also lots of happy activity on the farm.  There are nine more ewes due to lamb at anytime so there will be many more cute lambs to enjoy.  The birds are pairing off for lots of little ones in a couple of months and I caught T-Bone, the young steer, chasing his tail last night.

 Please stop by and enjoy the farm with us.

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