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Posts Tagged ‘chicken’

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We finally got started on our rotational grazing for the season.  The animals were more than ready.  We had them closed off to one section of the pasture for two weeks, allowing the rest of the pasture to get some growth.  The first picture shows the fairly distinct line between the two sections of pasture.  The rested pasture is six inches tall while the other section has been eaten to the ground.  The second picture shows the difference of no grazing.  Areas where the animals had not been permitted to graze at all are nearly a foot tall.

This will be our second season of rotational grazing.  We learned several lessons during our first season.

  1.  Portable shelters must be fairly stout, which makes them less portable.  The winds during severe storms and during the winter picked up and destroyed the portable shelters we built last summer.  This year we are toying with no shelters since the animals’ coats protect them from the rain.  However, we may also go with a few sturdy, less mobile shelters.
  2. Our sheep will not respect standard multi-strand electric fencing.  They have discovered that if they stick their heads between the wires, any shock to their wooly coats as they go through the fence is nominal.  The cows, however, rarely cross the fence.
  3. It doesn’t matter if you are feeding them the best quality, third-cutting hay available, sheep will still eat your pine trees.  See #2 on the fence issue.  That is why we will now use electric netting to keep the animals in place and is also why we have had to plant more pine trees.
  4. This past winter, we allowed the animals to have the run of the entire pasture, eating up any new grass in the early spring.  You can see the difference in the grass that has not been touched.  It may be better to have a “sacrifice” area closer to the barn, keeping the animals there the entire winter and allowing the rest of the pasture to get a better start.  This should allow us to start our rotational grazing sooner in the season and save on hay.  That will be something we try during this season.

Don’t forget.  We will be at the Zionsville Farmers’ Market beginning Saturday morning, May 18, from 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.  We hope to see you there.

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Spring Chickens

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The chickens that were hatching during last week’s post finally all hatched, at least all of them that were going to hatch.  We hatched 10 eggs of 24 last week.  That sounds like a bad ratio but we actually hatched 100% of the fertile eggs.  You see we have only 2 roosters with 43 hens so, not all of the eggs were fertile.  We will also be ordering 100 more broilers this spring to be delivered next week.

That’s quite a few spring chickens, but, we will need them all because we will be selling in three different farmers’ markets this year.  We will be selling at the:

–          Zionsville Farmers’ Market beginning May 18.  We will be sharing space with another vendor and therefore will only be at this market every other Saturday throughout the season.  The Zionsville Farmers’ Market is located at the corner of Main Street and Hawthorne in Zionsville from 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. each Saturday from May 18 through September 28.

–          Decatur Township Farmers’ Market beginning June 4.  This is the farmers’ market that Farmer Betsy started at Decatur Discovery Academy.  The market is located at 5106 S. High School Road, Indianapolis and will be held each Tuesday from 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. from June 4 through September 24.

–          A new organic market being formed in the area.  The dates and locations have not yet been determined.  We’ll share that information when it becomes available.

We will hold open hours on the farm from 12 p.m. – 6 p.m. this Sunday.  Given all of the new opportunities, these will be our last farm open hours.  That doesn’t mean we won’t be around, you may just want to call or e-mail beforehand.  We will also be raising our prices to compensate for market expenses.  We do plan to offer a discount for on farm purchases.  We will post our new price list soon.

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Caught Red-Handed

Well, not quite red-handed but one of us did spend a little too much time in the sun (that would be the blond, fair-skinned farmer).  They finally caught us and made us return to the farm.  It didn’t really take that much persuading though.

Farmhand Emily did an awesome job while we were away.  The animals were content and she did some greatly appreciated housekeeping.  She even got the snow to melt and the grass to green while we were gone.

We will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  We will also be around on Saturday planting trees.  We received 400 trees from the state nursery this week.  If you come by and help us on Saturday, we’ll give you a free dozen eggs.  We currently have available:

Eggs from free-range hens fed organic grain @$3.50 per dozen (and lots of them)

Whole Chickens raised on pasture and fed organic grain @ $4.00 per pound (lots of chicken too)

Hormone-free and antibiotic-free grass-fed lamb and goat (please see the price list for pricing by cut)

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Hippity Hoppity

Easter is on its way.  I wish spring really was too.  We will again be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  For your Easter dinner, we still have turkeys and whole chickens available for $4.00/lb. and leg of lamb available for $15.00/lb.  We also have ground lamb for $9.00/lb. and lamb chops for $10.00/lb.  If you like goat meat, we have some ground goat sausage for $7.00/lb.  There are still plenty of eggs available too at $3.50/dozen.

If you can make it through the snow they are forecasting, please come by.  If you can’t make it Sunday, you are always welcome to visit evenings during the week.

Finally, it is with sadness I share that Charles Stultz passed this week at the age of 98.  Charlie was the previous owner of our farm.  This was his farm for 59 years.  Charlie had other parties interested in the farm but we have always believed Charlie allowed us to purchase the farm because he saw himself, and how he would have cared for the farm, in us.  We are very appreciative of the opportunity you have allowed us Charlie.  May you rest in peace.

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We will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  Come by and visit Bambi the lamb and our newest addition, Darcy, the Dexter calf.

Darcy was born earlier this week so, it wasn’t on St. Patrick’s Day but she still gets an Irish name.  Darcy means dark or dark-haired and the name will fit her perfectly.  She will likely keep her color as her mother is dark brown as well.  Darcy’s luck is that she is a heifer calf and therefore gets a pretty name, instead of a “food” name the males generally get.

Speaking of St. Patrick’s Day, you should join Farmer Betsy and Farmer Paul for Sunday brunch at The Loft Restaurant at Traders Point Creamery.  Farmer Paul will be having the lamb stew served with our own Full Circle Farm lamb.  Farmer Betsy is leaning toward Eggs O’ Kunz.  You had better come early though.  We eat right at 9:30 a.m.

While we are on the topic of what to eat, it is time to start planning your Easter dinner.  We have leg of lamb available for $15.00/lb.  These legs weigh around two pounds and have been de-boned and rolled.  We have two turkeys available for $4.00/lb.  These turkeys are 8.65 lbs and 8.90 lbs.  We also still have plenty of whole chickens available for $4.00/lb.  Stop in and let us help you plan your Easter dinner.

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We will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  We currently have available:

Eggs from free-range hens fed organic grain

Whole Chickens raised on pasture and fed organic grain

Hormone-free and antibiotic-free grass-fed lamb and goat

We accept cash, checks, and credit cards as payment.

Four more lambs were born this week.  We now have 16 lambs on the farm and Bambi is still living in the house with us.  Bambi is the bottle lamb we saved last week.  We tried to re-introduce her to her mother and, it worked, but she just wasn’t strong enough to take the cold, damp weather.  So Bambi has been living inside with us.  Farmer Betsy has even been taking her to school every day.  Bambi gets lots of attention.

We can’t let Bambi live inside too long though.  We’re already tired of cleaning up after her but it is also not healthy for her, physically or emotionally, to live inside too long.  She is already getting too attached to us and she needs to adjust to the outdoors.  I have put together a dog kennel in the yard for Bambi and we will probably start getting her used to the outdoors this weekend as the weather warms.

If you are visiting us on Facebook, please visit our website at www.thefullcirclefarm.com for our price list and more information about our farm.  If you are visiting our website, you may also become our friend on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/fullcircle.farm.5.

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Soggy and Soupy

ImageWe will be open this Sunday from 12 -6 p.m.  We currently have available:

Eggs from free-range hens fed organic grain

Whole Chickens raised on pasture and fed organic grain

Hormone-free and antibiotic-free grass-fed lamb and goat

We accept cash, checks, and credit cards as payment.

It’s been a fairly busy week on the farm.  Since our last post, nine more lambs have been born.  We even have our first, and hopefully only, bottle lamb.  She’s sleeping under a heat lamp right now.  The chickens have really started on the eggs too.  We are working our way toward two dozen each day.

We always welcome visitors to the farm.  Please come visit the lambs this weekend.  If you plan on an outside tour, make sure to bring your muck boots.  The recent rains and melted snows have made our pastures quite soggy and soupy.  We look forward to seeing you.

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We will be open this Sunday from 12 – 6 p.m.  We currently have available free-range eggs, pastured whole chickens, and grass-fed lamb and goat.  We have had quite a bit of website activity recently, at least for us.  For those of you new to Full Circle Farm, we have an open farm policy and welcome you to visit any time.  We are generally available evenings through the week and afternoons during the weekend, but, who knows what may come up.  Our regular Sunday hours are to ensure that someone will be here to serve you.  We accept cash, check, and credit cards as payment.

We hope you all enjoyed your Valentine week with the ones you love.  It has been an interesting week on the farm.  We had our first set of triplet lambs this week only to lose two of them by week’s end.  The mother ewe has calmed down and is feeding the remaining ram lamb quite well.  It’s heartbreaking to lose any animal, especially when they pass as you are trying to save them.  Unfortunately, that’s part of life on the farm.  Fortunately, there is also lots of happy activity on the farm.  There are nine more ewes due to lamb at anytime so there will be many more cute lambs to enjoy.  The birds are pairing off for lots of little ones in a couple of months and I caught T-Bone, the young steer, chasing his tail last night.

 Please stop by and enjoy the farm with us.

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